Ryan Harter

Hosting a Private Maven Repo on Amazon S3

Remember the olden days of Android development? There were times when including a library in a project meant relative links to source, or using Maven. Fortunately for us, those days are long gone now with the introduction of Gradle. Gradle has made developing and consuming libraries for Android amazingly simple, and has spurred a new boom in library development for Android. We’ve always had a large, open, inclusive community to boast of, but over the past year or two it has only gotten better as the community has matured....

Custom Drawables

We’ve all seen posts about why you should use custom views when applicable and how it can help you properly encapsulate your application code. What we don’t see quite as much is how this type of thinking can be translated to other, non-View related, portions of our apps. In my app, Fragment, there are a few places where I make use of custom Drawables to encapsulate my logic just like you would for a custom View....

The Architecture effect of Test Driven Development

I’ve finally done it. In the latest client project I’m working on I’ve decided to take a test first approach. I’ve been wanting to experience Test Driven Development on Android for years, but have never felt comfortable enough to really commit. After reading through Kent Beck’s book and checking out Corey Latislaw’s latest book, I decided I was ready to make the leap. I’ll write some more later about my experience, reactions, and what I’ve learned, but today I wanted to share a slightly unexpected benefit....

Styling Chromecast Icons

One of my favorite new devices from Google is the Chromecast. I have 3 throughout my house, and one for travel. It’s great to have a cheap device that anyone can stream to. I’ve also had the pleasure of integrating Google Cast support on several apps in my freelancing business. These are usually pretty cut and dry, but I recently had a client who needed a custom Google Cast action item which was one of many colors, depending on where you are in the app....

What's Your Intent?

One of the most powerful, yet sometimes overlooked, features of Android is the Intent system. Android’s Intents allow apps to interact with each other, without intimate knowledge of each other. Intents are one of the differentiating factors that allows Android apps to interact and send data beyond their walls, while still keeping the system relatively safe. Anatomy of an Intent I like to think of Intents as the opposite of URLs....

Using Gestures

Modern Android apps often make use of gesture interaction to provide fluid, natural interaction with the app. There are a few ways to handle these interactions, and in this post I’m going to cover some of the basics for easily adding gesture support to your app. The code for this sample app can be found at Github. The basic building blocks of this simple gesture handling code is the GestureDetector, and the various OnGestureListeners....

Kindly Asking for Ratings and Reviews

One of the most important factors in determining whether or not people will buy your app is the rating. Especially if your app isn’t free, people will generally check the ratings and reviews before downloading your app. And if your app is a paid app, ratings and reviews can mean success or failure for your app. When launching Fragment for Android, our first though was making a kick ass app, but then we needed to think about how to ensure that users remembered to go back to the Play Store to share their experience by rating the app....

Building Dynamic Custom Views

Last week I released Fragment for Android. Fragment is made up of all sorts of custom Views, which I think sets it apart from many apps in the Play Store. Some of these views have a similar pattern to views I’ve had to create for other apps, in which a scroll view has padding such that every item within it can be scrolled to the center of the view. On it’s surface this doesn’t seem complex, but when you consider the massive difference in screen sizes available on Android, things get a little more complicated....

Bringing Fragment to Android

In November 2013, Ben Guerrette from Pixite reached out to me after reading my post about my experience being featured on the Google Play. He was interested in bringing one of their iOS photo apps to Android. At this point I wasn’t familiar with Pixite, so I promptly fired up the Google to do my research. I was quite impressed with what I found. The guys at Pixite had created some really cool photo apps for iOS, and when I searched Google Play for similar offerings on Android, I found next to nothing....

A Modern CI Server for Android

As a freelance Android developer, I’ve gotten the opportunity to work with many different client environments when it comes to building and releasing Android (and other) apps. One of the things that I’ve learned over the years is the importance of a good build server. Why CI? Continuous Integration servers, or CI servers, are designed to checkout your code after each push and build your project, including any tests you might have....